February 2, 2015

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Stepping Back to See The Bigger Picture

Something we tend to be bad at in the old Agile Software Development lark is the Big Picture problem.

I see time and again teams up to their necks in small details - individual users stories, specific test cases, individual components and classes - and rarely taking a step back to look at the problem as a whole.

The end result can often be a piecemeal solution that grows one detail at a time to reveal a patchwork quilt of a design, in the worst way.

While each individual piece may be perfectly rational in its design, when we pull back to get the bird's eye view, we realise that - as a whole - what we've created doesn't make much sense.

In other creative disciplines, a more mature approach is taken. Painters, for example, will often sketch out the basic composition before getting out their brushes. Film producers will go through various stages of "pre-visualisation" before any cameras (real or virtual) star rolling. Composers and music producers will rough out the structure of a song before worrying about how the kick drum should be EQ'd.

In all of these disciplines, the devil is just as much in the detail as in software development (one vocal slightly off-pitch can ruin a whole arrangement, one special effect that doesn't quite come off can ruin a movie, one eye slightly larger than the other can destroy the effect of a portrait in oil - well, unless you're Picasso, of course; and there's another way in which we can be like painters, claiming that "it's mean to be like that" when users report a bug.)

Perhaps in an overreaction to the Big Design Up-Front excesses of the 1990's, these days teams seem to skip the part where we establish an overall vision. Like a painter's initial rough pencil sketch, or a composer's basic song idea mapped out on an acoustic guitar, we really do need some rough idea of what the thing we're creating as a whole might look like. And, just as with pencil sketches and song ideas recorded on Dictaphones, we can allow it to change based on the feedback we get as we flesh it out, but still maintain an overall high-level vision. They don't take long to establish, and I would argue that if we can't sketch out our vision, then maybe - just maybe - it's because we don't have one yet.

Another thing they do that I find we usually don't (anywhere near enough) is continually step back and look at the thing as a whole while we're working on the details.

Watch a painter work, and you'll see they spend almost as much time standing back from the canvas just looking at it as they do up close making fine brush strokes. They may paint one brush stroke at a time, but the overall painting is what matters most. The vase of flowers may be rendered perfectly by itself, but if its perspective differs from its surroundings, it's going to look wrong all the same.

Movie directors, too, frequently step back and look at an edit-in-progress to check that the footage they've shot fits into a working story. They may film movies one shot at a time, but the overall movie is what matters most. An actor may perform a perfect take, but if the emotional pitch of their performance doesn't make sense at that exact point in the story, it's going to seem wrong.

When a composer writes a song, they will often play it all the way through up to the point they're working on, to see how the piece flows. A great melody or a killer riff might seem totally wrong if it's sandwiched in between two passages that it just doesn't fit in with.

This is why a recommend to the developers that they, too, routinely take a step back and look at how the detail they're currently working on fits in with the whole. Run the application, walk through user journeys that bring you to that detail and see how that feels in context. It may seem like a killer feature to you, but a killer feature in the wrong place is just a wrong feature.






Posted 2 years, 10 months ago on February 2, 2015