March 1, 2015

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Continuous Inspection at NorDevCon

On Friday, I spent a very enjoyable day at the Norfolk developer's conference NorDevCon (do you see what they did there?) It was my second time at the conference, having given the opening keynote last year, and it's great to see it going from strength to strength (attendance up 50% on 2014), and to see Norwich and Norfolk being recognised as an emerging tech hub that's worthy of inward investment.

I was there to run a workshop on Continuous Inspection, and it was a good lark. You can check out the slides, which probably won't make a lot of sense without me there to explain them - but come along to CraftConf in Budapest this April or SwanseaCon 2015 in September and I'll answer your questions.

You can also take a squint at (or have a play with) some code I knocked up in C# to illustrate a custom FxCop code rule (Feature Envy) to see how I implemented the example from the slides in a test-driven way.

I'm new to automating FxCop (and an infrequent visitor to .NET Land), so please forgive any naivity. Hopefully you get the idea. The key things to take away are: you need a model of the code (thanks Microsoft.Cci.dll), you need a language to express rules against that model (thanks C#), and you need a way to drive the implementation of rules by writing executable tests that fail (thanks NUnit). The fun part is turning the rule implementation on its own code - eating your own dog food, so to speak. Throws up all sorts of test cases you didn't think of. It's a work in progress!

I now plan, before CraftConf, to flesh the project out a bit with 2-3 more example custom rules.

Having enjoyed a catch-up with someone who just happens to be managing the group at Microsoft who are working on code analysis tools, I think 2015-2016 is going to see some considerable ramp-up in interest as the tools improve and integration across the dev lifecycle gets tighter. If Continuous Inspection isn't on your radar today, you may want to put it on your radar for tomorrow. It's going to be a thing.

Right now, though, Continuous Inspection is very much a niche pastime. An unscientific straw poll on social media, plus a trawl of a couple of UK job sites, suggests that less than 1% of teams might even be doing automated code analysis at all.

I predicted a few years ago that, as computers get faster and code gets more complex, frequent testing of code quality using automated tools is likely to become more desirable and more do-able. I think we're just on the cusp of that new era today. Today, code quality is an ad hoc concern relying on hit-and-miss practices like pair programming, where many code quality issues often get overlooked by pair who have 101 other things to think about, and code reviews, where issues - if they get spotted at all in the to-and-fro - are flagged up long after anybody is likely to do anything about them.

In related news, after much discussion and braincell-wrangling, I've chosen the name for the conference that will be superceding Software Craftsmanship 20xx later this year (because craftsmanship is kind of done now as a meme). Watch this space.







Posted 2 years, 11 months ago on March 1, 2015