April 25, 2015

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Non-Functional Tests Can Help Avoid Over-Engineering (And Under-Engineering)

Building on the topic of how we tackle non-functional requirements like code quality, I'm reminded of those times where my team has evolved an architecture that developers taking over from us didn't understand the reasons or rationale for.

More than once, I've seen software and systems scrapped and new teams start again from scratch because they felt the existing solution was "over-engineered".

Then, months later, someone on the new team reports back to me that, over time, their design has had to necessarily evolve into something similar to what they scrapped.

In these situations it can be tricky: a lot of software really is over-engineered and a simpler solution would be possible (and desirable in the long term).

But how do we tell? How can we know that the design is the simplest thing that a team could have done?

For that, I think, we need to look at how we'd know that software was functionally over-complicated and see if we can project any lessons we leearn on to non-functional complexity.

A good indicator of whether code is really needed is to remove it and see if any acceptannce tests fail. You'd be surprised how many features and branches in code find their way in there without the customer asking for them. This is especially true when teams don't practice test-driven development. Developers make stuff up.

Surely the same goes for the non-functional stuff? If I could simplify the design, and my non-functional tests still pass, then it's probable that the current design is over-engineered. But in order to do that, we'd need a set of explicit non-functional tests. And most teams don't have those. Which is why designs can so easily get over-engineered.

Just a thought.



Posted 2 years, 9 months ago on April 25, 2015