April 20, 2016

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

A* - A Truly Iterative Development Process

Much to my chagrin, having promoted the idea for so many years, software development still hasn't caught on to the idea that what we ought to be doing is iterating towards goals.

NOT working through a queue of tasks. NOT working through a queue of features.

Working towards a goal. A testable goal.

We, as an industry, have many names for working through queues: Agile, Scrum, Kanban, Feature-driven Development, the Unified Process, DSDM... All names for "working through a prioritised list of stuff that needs to be done or delivered". Of course, the list is allowed to change depending on feedback. But the goal is usually missing. Without the goal, what are we iterating towards?

Ironically, working through a queue of items to be delivered isn't iterating - something I always understood to be the whole point of Agile. But, really, iterating means repeating a process, feeding back the results of each cycle, until we reach some goal. Reaching the goal is when we're done.

What name do we give to "iterating towards a testable goal"? So far, we have none. Buzzword Bingo hasn't graced the door of true iterative development yet.

Uncatchy names like goal-driven development and competitive engineering do exist, but haven't caught on. Most teams still don't even have even a vague idea of the goals of their project or product. They're just working through a list that somebody - a customer, a product owner, a business analyst - dreamed up. Everyone's assuming that somebody else knows what the goal is. NEWSFLASH: They don't.

The Codemanship way compels us to ditch the list. There is no release plan. Only business/user goals and progress. Features and change requests only come into focus for the very near future. The question that starts every rapid iteration is "where are we today, and what's the least we could do today to get closer to where we need to be?" Think of development as a graph algorithm: we're looking for the shortest path from where we are to some destination. There are many roads we could go down, but we're particularly interested in exploring those that bring us closer to our destination.

Now imagine a shortest-path algorithm that has no concept of destination. It's just a route map, a plan - an arbitrary sequence of directions that some product owner came up with that we hope will take us somewhere good, wherever that might be. Yup It just wouldn't work, would it? We'd have to be incredibly lucky to end up somewhere good - somewhere of value.

And so it is - in my quest for a one-word name to describe "iteratively seeking the shortest (cheapest) path to a testable goal", I propose simply A*

As in:

"What method are we following on this project?"

"A*"

Of course, there are prioritised lists in my A* method: but they are short and only concern themselves with what we're doing next to TRY to bring us closer to our goal. Teams meet every few days (or every day, if you're really keen), assess progress made since last meeting, and come up with a very short plan, the results of which will be assessed at the next meeting. And rinse and repeat.

In A*, the product owner has no vision of the solution, only a vision of the problem, and a clear idea of how we'll know when that problem's been solved. Their primary role is to tell us if we're getting warmer or colder with each short cycle, and to help us identify where to aim next.

They don't describe a software product, they describe the world around that product, and how it will be changed by what we deliver. We ain't done until we see that change.

This puts a whole different spin on software development. We don't set out with a product vision and work our way through a list of features, even if that list is allowed to change. We work towards a destination - accepting that some avenues will turn out to be dead-ends - and all our focus is on finding the cheapest way to get there.

And, on top of all that, we embrace the notion that the destination itself may be a moving target. And that's why we don't waste time and effort mapping out the whole route beyond the near future. Any plan that tries to look beyond a few days ends up being an expensive fiction that we become all too easily wedded to.







Posted 1 year ago on April 20, 2016