September 13, 2016

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

4 Things You SHOULDN'T Do When The Schedule's Slipping

It takes real nerve to do the right thing when your delivery date's looming and you're behind on your plan.

Here are four things you should really probably avoid when the schedule's slipping:

1. Hire more developers

It's been over 40 years since the publication of Fred L. Brooks' 'The Mythical Man-Month'. This means that our industry has known for almost my entire life that adding developers to a late project makes it later.

Not only is this born out by data on team size vs. productivity, but we also have a pretty good idea what the causal mechanism is.

Like climate change, people who reject this advice should not be called "skeptics" any more. In the face of the overwhelming evidence, they're Small Team Deniers.

Hiring more devs when the schedule's slipping is like prescribing cigarettes, boxed sets and bacon for a patient with high blood pressure.

2. Cut corners

Still counterintuitively, for most software managers, the relationship between software quality and the time and cost of delivery is not what most of us think it is.

Common sense might lead us to believe that more reliable software takes longer, but the mountain of industry data on this clearly shows the opposite in the vast majority of cases.

To a point - and it's a point 99% of teams are in no danger of crossing - it actually takes less effort to deliver more reliable software.

Again, the causal mechanism for this is well understood. And, again, anyone who rejects the evidence is not a "skeptic"; they're a Defect Prevention Denier.

The way to go faster on 99% of projects is to slow down, and take more care.

3. Work longer hours

Another management myth that's been roundly debunked by the evidence is that, when a software delivery schedule's slipping significantly, teams can get back on track by working longer hours.

The data very clearly shows that - for most kinds of work - longer hours is a false economy. But it's especially true for writing software, which requires a level of concentration and focus that most jobs don't.

Short spurts of extra effort - maybe the odd weekend or late night - can make a small difference in the short term, but day after day, week after week overtime will burn your developers out faster than you can say "get a life". They'll make stupid, easily avoidable mistakes. And, as we've seen, mistakes cost exponentially more to fix than to avoid. This is why teams who routinely work overtime tend to have lower overall productivity: they're too busy fighting their own self-inflicted fires.

You can't "cram" software development. Like your physics final exams, if you're nowhere near ready a week before, then you're not gong to be ready, and no amount of midnight oil and caffeine is going to fix that.

You'll get more done with teams who are rested, energised, feeling positive, and focused.

4. Bribe the team to hit the deadline

Given the first three points we've covered here, promising to shower the team with money and other rewards to hit a deadline is just going to encourage them to make those mistakes for you.

Rewarding teams for hitting deadlines fosters a very 1-dimensional view of software development success. It places extra pressure on developers to do the wrong things: to grow the size of their teams, to cut corners, and to work silly hours. It therefore has a tendency to make things worse.

The standard wheeze, of course, is for teams to pretend that they hit the deadline by delivering something that looks like finished software. The rot under the bonnet quickly becomes apparent when the business then expects a second release. Now the team are bogged down in all the technical debt they took on for the first release, often to the extent that new features and change requests become out of the question.

Yes, we hit the deadline. No, we can't make it any better. You want changes? Then you'll have to pay us to do it all over again.


Granted, it takes real nerve, when the schedule's slipping and the customer is baying for blood, to keep the team small, to slow down and take more care, and to leave the office at 5pm.

Ultimately, the fate of teams rests with the company cultures that encourage and reward doing the wrong thing. Managers get rewarded for managing bigger teams. Developers get rewarded for being at their desk after everyone else has gone home, and appearing to hit deadlines. Perversely, as an industry, it's easier to rise to the top by doing the wrong thing in these situations. Until we stop rewarding that behaviour, little will change.









Posted 1 year, 3 months ago on September 13, 2016