November 8, 2016

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Business Benefits of Continuous Delivery: We Need Hard Data

Something that's been bugging me for a while is our apparent lack of attention to the proclaimed business benefits of Continuous Delivery.

I'm not going to argue for one second that CD doesn't have business benefits; I'm a firm believer in the practice myself. But that's just it... I'm a believer in the business benefits of Continuous Delivery. And it's a belief based on personal and anecdotal experience, not on a good, solid body of hard evidence.

I had naturally assumed that such evidence existed, given that the primary motivation for CD, mentioned over and over again in the literature, is the reduced lead times on delivering feature and change requests. It is, after all, the main point of CD.

But where is the data that supports reduced lead times? I've looked, but not found it. I've found surveys about adopting CD. I've found proposed metrics, but no data. I've found largely qualitative studies of one or two organisations. But no smoking gun, as yet.

There's a mountain of data that backs up the benefits of defect prevention, but the case for CI currently rests on little more than smoke.

This, I reckon, we need to fix. It's a pillar on which so much of software craftsmanship and Agile rests; delivering working software sooner (and for longer).

Anything that supports the case for Continuous Delivery indirectly supports the case for Continuous Integration, TDD, refactoring, automation, and a bunch of other stuff we believe is good for business. And as such, I think we need that pillar to unassailably strong.

We need good data - not from surveys and opinion polls - on lead times that we can chart against CD practices so we can build a picture of what real, customer-visible impact these practices have.

To be genuinely useful and compelling, it would need to come from hundreds of places and cover the full spectrum of Continuous Delivery from infrequent manual builds with infrequent testing and no automation, to completely automated Continuous Deployment several times a day with high confidence.

One thing that would of particular interest to Agile mindsets would be how the lead times change over time. As the software grows, do lead times get longer? What difference does, say, automated developer testing make to the shape of the curve?

Going beyond that, can we understand what impact shorter lead times can have on a business? Shorter lead times, in of themselves have no value. The value is in what they enable a business to do - specifically, to learn faster. But what, in real terms, are the business benefits of learning faster? How would we detect them? Are businesses that do CD outperforming competitors who don't in some way? Are they better at achieving their goals?

Much to ponder on.






Posted 11 months, 3 days ago on November 8, 2016