December 21, 2016

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

"Our Developers Don't Do Any Design". Yes They Do. They Have To.

A complaint I hear often from managers about their development teams is "they don't do any design".

This is a nonsense, of course. Designedness - is that a word? It is now - is a spectrum, with complete randomness at one end and zero randomness at the other. i.e., completely unintentional vs. nothing unintentional.

Working code is very much towards the zero randomness end of the spectrum. Code with no design wouldn't even compile, let alone kind of sort of work.



To look at it another way, working code is a tiny, tiny subset of possible combinations of alphanumeric characters. The probability of accidentally stumbling on a sequence of random characters that makes working code is so vanishingly remote, we can dismiss it as obvious silliness.



Arguably, software design is a process of iteratively whittling down the possibilities until we arrive at something that ticks the right boxes, of which there will be so very many if the resulting software is to do what the customer wants.

It's clear, though, that this tiny set of possible working code configurations contains more than one choice. And when you say "they don't do any design", what you really mean is "I don't like the design that they've chosen". They've done lots and lots of design, making hundreds and thousands (and possibly millions) of design choices. You would just prefer they made different design choices.

In which case, you need to more clearly define the properties of this tiny subset that would satisfy your criteria. Should they require modules in their design to be more loosely coupled, for example? If so, then add that to the list of requirements; the tests their design needs to pass.

Finally, in some cases, when managers claim their development teams "don't do any design", what they really mean is they don't follow a prescribed design process, producing the requisite artefacts as proof that design was done.

The finished product is the ultimate design artefact. If you want to know what they built, look at the code. The design is in there. And if you can't understand the code, maybe you should let someone who can worry about design.





Posted 9 months, 5 days ago on December 21, 2016