January 18, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

How Long Would Your Organisation Last Without Programmers?

A little straw poll I did recently on Twitter has proved to be especially timely after a visit to the accident & emergency ward at my local hospital (don't worry - I'm fine).



It struck me just how reliant hospitals have become on largely bespoke IT systems (that's "software" to me and you). From the moment you walk in to see the triage nurse, there's software - you're surrounded by it. The workflow of A&E is carefully controlled via a system they all access. There are computerised machines that take your blood pressure, monitor your heart, peer into your brain and build detailed 3D models, and access your patient records so they don't accidentally cut off the wrong leg.

From printing out prescriptions to writing notes to your family doctor, it all involves computers now.

What happens if all the software developers mysteriously disappeared overnight? There'd be nobody to fix urgent bugs. Would the show-stoppers literally stop the show?

I can certainly see how that would happen in, say, a bank. And I've worked in places where - without 24/7 bug-fixing support - they'd be completely incapable of processing their overnight orders, creating a massive and potentially un-shiftable backlog that could crush their business in a few weeks.

Ultimately, DR is all about coping in the short term, and getting business-as-usual (or some semblance of it) up and running as quickly as possible. It can delay, but not avoid, the effects of having nobody who can write or fix code.

And I'm aware that big organisations have "disaster recovery" plans. I've been privy to quite a few in my lofty position as Chief Technical Arguer in some very large businesses. But all the DR plans I've seen have never asked "what happens if there's nobody to fix it?"

Smart deployers, of course, can just roll back a bad release to the last one that worked, ensuring continuity... for a while. But I know business code: even when it's working, it's often riddled with unknown bugs, waiting to go off, like little business-killing landmines. I've fixed bugs in COBOL that were written in the 1960s.

Realistically, rolling back your systems by potentially decades is not an option. You probably don't even have access to that old code. Or, if you do, someone will have to re-type it all in from code listings kept in cupboards.

And even if you could revert your way back to a reliable system with potential longevity, without the ability to change and adapt those systems to meet future needs will soon start to eat away at your organisation from the inside.

It's food for thought.



Posted 3 months, 1 day ago on January 18, 2017