March 6, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Start With A Goal. The Backlog Will Follow.

The little pairing project I'm doing with my 'apprentice' Will at the moment started with a useful reminder of just how powerful it can be to start development with goals, instead of asking for a list of features.

As usual, it was going to be some kind of community video library (it's always a community video library, when will you learn!!!), and - with my customer role-playing hat on - I envisaged the usual video library-ish features: borrowing videos, returning videos, donating videos, and so on.

But, at this point in my mentoring, I'm keen for Will to get some experience working in a wider perspective, so I insisted we started with a business goal.

I stipulated that the aim of the video library was to enable cash-strapped movie lovers to watch a different movie every day for a total cost of less than £100 a year. We fired up Excel and ran some numbers, and figured out that - in a group with similar tastes (e.g,, sci-fi, romantic comedies, etc) - you might need only 40 people to club together to achieve this.

This reframed the whole exercise. A movie club with 40 members could run their library out of a garden shed, using pencil and paper to keep basic records of who has what on loan. They could run an online poll to decide what titles to buy each month. They didn't really need software tools for managing their library.

The hard part, it seemed to us, would be finding people in your local area with similar tastes in movies. So the focus of our project shifted from managing a collection of DVDs to connecting with other movie lovers to form local clubs.

Out of that goal, a small feature list almost wrote itself. This is how planning should work; not with backlogs of feature requests, but with customers and developers closely collaborating to achieve goals.

It's similar in many ways to how TDD should work - in fact, arguably, it is TDD (except we start with business tests). When I'm showing teams how to do TDD, I advise them not to think of a design and then start writing unit tests for all the classes and methods and getters and setters they think they're gloing to need. Start with a customer test, and drive your internal design directly from that. Classes and methods and getters and setters will naturally emerge as and when they're needed.

When I run the Codemanship Agile Software Development workshop, we do it backwards to illustrate this point. Teams are tasked with coming up with internal designs, and then I ask them to write some customer tests afterwards. Inevitably, they realise their internal design isn't what they really needed. Stepping further back, I ask them to describe the business goals of their software, and at least half the teams realise they're building the wrong thing.

So, my advice... Ditch the backlog and start with a goal. The rest will follow.



Posted 3 weeks, 1 day ago on March 6, 2017