March 22, 2017

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Digital Strategy: Why Are Software Developers Excluded From The Conversation?

I'm running another Twitter poll - yes, me and my polls! - spurred on by a conversation I had with a non-technical digital expert (not sure how you can be a non-technical digital expert, but bear with me) in which I asked if there were any software developers attending the government's TechNation report launch today.




This has been a running bugbear for me; the apparent unwillingness to include the people who create the tech in discussions about creating tech. Imagine a 'HealthNation' event where doctors weren't invited...

The response spoke volumes about how our profession is viewed by the managers, marketers, recruiters, politicians and other folk sticking their oars into our industry. Basically, strategy is non of our beeswax. We just write the code. Other geniuses come up with the ideas and make all the important stuff happen.

I don't think we're alone in this predicament. Teachers tell me that there are many events about education strategy where you'll struggle to find an actual educator. Doctors tell me likewise that they're often excluded from the discussion about healthcare. Professionals are just there to do as we're told, it seems. Often by people with no in-depth understanding of what it is they're telling us to do.

This particular person asserted that software development isn't really that important to the economy. This flies in the face of newspaper story after newspaper story about just how critical it is to the functioning of our modern economy. The very same people who see no reason to include developers in the debate also tell us that in decades to come, all businesses will be digital businesses.

So which is it? Is digital technology - that's computers and software to you and me - now so central to modern life that our profession is as critical today as masons were in medieval times? Or can any fool 'code' software, and what's really needed is better PR people?

What's clear is that highly skilled professions like software development - and teaching, and medicine - have had their status undermined to the point where nobody cares what the practitioner thinks any more. Except other practitioners, perhaps.

This runs hand-in-hand with a gradual erosion in real terms of earnings. A developer today, on average, earns 25% less then she did 10 years ago. This trend plains against the grain of the "skills crisis" narrative, and more accurately portrays the real picture where developers are seen as cogs in the machine.

If we're not careful, and this trend continues, software development could become such a low-status profession in the UK that the smartest people will avoid it. This, coupled with a likely brain drain after Brexit, will have the reverse effect to what initiatives like TechNation are aiming for. Despite managers and marketers seeing no great value in software developers, where the rubber meets the road, and some software has to be created, we need good ones. Banks need them. Supermarkets need them. The NHS needs them. The Ministry of Defence needs them. Society needs them.

But I'm not sure they're going about the right way of getting them. Certainly, ignoring the 400,000 people in the UK who currently do it doesn't send the best message to smart young people who might be considering it. They could be more attracted to working in tech marketing, or for a VC firm, or in the Dept of Trade & Industry formulating tech policy.

But if we lack the people to actually make the technology work, what will they be marketing, funding and formulating policy about? They'd be a record industry without any music.

Now, that's not to say that marketing and funding and government policy don't matter. It's all important. But if it's all important, why are the people who really make the technology excluded from the conversation?







Posted 3 months, 1 day ago on March 22, 2017