May 4, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

20 Dev Metrics - 14. Interface Specificity

The 14th in my series of 20 Dev Metrics is Interface Specificity, which measures the extent to which interfaces are made to be client or usage-specific. That is to say, the extent to which interfaces only include methods that specific clients need to use.

This helps us to observe the interface segregation principle (the "I" in "SOLID"), and reminds us that interfaces are for collaborating through, and therefore should be designed from the client's perspective.

Imagine we have a class Book, which has methods for getting the ISBN of a publication, and the rating. A class Library uses the ISBN to search for books, and a different class BookStats uses the rating to calculate statistics about the book.



The Library doesn't need to know about a book's rating, and BookStats doesn't need to know its ISBN. Generally speaking, we should seek to limit the knowledge classes have about other classes in the system, so we can limit the chances of it being broken by changes. So instead of binding both Library and BookStats to the same general Book class, instead we can split Book's interface and expose them only to the method they need to use.



Interface Specificity is calculated thus: divide the number of methods used by a client class by the total number of methods exposed by the supplier type. If the supplier only exposes methods used by that client, then Interface Specificity is 100%. If the supplier has 4 methods, and the client only uses 2, then it's 50%. And so on.

An average of Interface Specificity across the software could serve as an indicator of how we're doing generally on this front. It would rarely reach 100%, but 80% or above would suggest we're probably doing okay.



Posted 5 months, 5 days ago on May 4, 2017