May 9, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

What Makes a Software Developer? The Rule of Two

I've been thinking a lot recently about what might qualify someone as a "software developer". For sure, it's not just someone who can code. (Any more than a builder is just someone who can lay bricks.)

One rule of thumb I've used with some success over the years is a rule of two: a software developer, in my experience, is someone who has practical hands-on skills in at least two of everything.

* 2 different programming paradigms (e.g., structured & OO)
* 2 different technology stacks (e.g., LAMP and .NET)
* 2 different kinds of application (e.g., desktop and mobile)
* 2 different problem domains (e.g., banking and medicine)
* 2 different approaches to development (e.g., Extreme Programming & RUP)

Essentially, someone who's been around the block at least twice in their careers.

The reason why I think this matters is that folk tend to need to see multiple examples of something before they can start to draw some key underlying insights. If you've only ever done BDD, you may not be aware that almost all approaches to requirements specification are example- or scenario-driven. If you've only ever worked in, say, Java, you may miss the fact that encapsulation isn't exclusively an OO concept. (Yes, you can have loosely coupled modules in Pascal, C, etc, too).

I'd also be interested in the responsibilities a developer has taken on in their careers. I've been a programmer, a tech lead, an architect, a requirements analyst, a methodologist, a strategist, a coach, a conference speaker, a conference organiser, an author, a business owner, and a trainer in my twelvety five years in this career. Wearing multiple hats - like working in multiple languages - can bring insights that decades working exclusively at the code face would probably miss.

So now, as my attentions turn to focus on the whole question of long-term mentoring for would-be software developers, the >rule of two may well be a key part of the process of identifying who might make good mentors, as well as potentially provide a roadmap for mentoring itself. Essentially, we'd be looking to guide rookies at least twice around the block, allowing them a chance to build those insights for themselves.



Posted 2 months, 3 days ago on May 9, 2017