May 16, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

My Obligatory Annual Rant About People Who Warn That You Can Take Quality Too Far Like It's An Actual Thing That Happens To Dev Teams

If you teach developers TDD, you can guarantee to bump into people who'll warn you of the dangers of taking quality too far (dun-dun-duuuuuuun!)

"We don't write the tests first because it protects us from over-testing our code", said one person recently. Ah, yes. Over-testing. A common problem in software.

"You need to be careful not to refactor your code too much", said another. And many's the time I've looked at code and thought "This program is just too easy to understand!"

I can't help recalling the time a UK software company, whose main product had literally thousands of open bugs, hired a VP of Quality and sent him around the dev teams warning them that "perfection is the enemy of good enough". Because that was their problem; the software was just too good.

It seems to still pervade our industry's culture, this idea that quality is the enemy of getting things done, despite mountains of very credible evidence that - in the vast majority of cases - the reverse is true. Most dev teams would deliver sooner if they delivered better software. Not aiming for perfection is the enemy of getting shit done more accurately sums up the relationship between quality and productivity in our line of work.

That's not to say that there aren't any teams who have ever taken it too far. In safety-critical software, the costs ramp up very quickly for very modest improvements in reliability. But the fact is that 99.9% of teams are so far away from this asymptote that, from where they're standing, good enough and too good are essentially the same destination.

Worry about wasting time on silly misunderstandings about the requirements. Worry about wasting time fixing avoidable coding errors. Worry about wasting time trying to hack your way through incomprehensible spaghetti code to make changes. Worry about wasting your time doing the same repeatable tasks manually over and over again.

But you very probably needn't worry about over-testing your code. Or about doing too much refactoring. Or about making the software too good. You're almost certainly not in any immediate danger of that.








Posted 7 hours, 21 minutes ago on May 16, 2017