July 4, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Are We Only Pretending To Care About Cost of Change?

Wise folk have occasionally told me - when I've claimed that "I really wanted X" - that, if X was within my control, then I couldn't have wanted it badly enough or I'd have X.

You know, like when someone says "I really wish I knew Spanish"? Obviously, they really don't. Or they'd know Spanish.

Likewise when development teams say "I really wish we understood our end users better". Evidently not. Or we'd understand our end users better.

And, talking about it today with colleagues, there's a nice little list of things development teams are only pretending to care about. If they did, they'd have done something about it.

Take the cost of changing code. Is your team tracking that? Do you know how much it cost to add, change or delete a line of code for your last release? Do you know how the cost of changing is, well, changing?

The vast majority of teams don't keep those kinds of records, even though the information is almost always available to figure it out. Got version control? You can get a graph of code churn. Got project management or accounts? Then you know how much money was spent during those same periods. Just divide the latter by the former, and - bazinga! - cost of changing a line of code.

The fact that most of us don't have that number to hand strongly suggests that, despite our loudest protestations, we don't really care about it.

And what's very interesting is that it's no different within the software craftsmanship community. We talk about cost of change a great deal, but I've yet to meet a self-identifying software craftsperson who knows the cost of changing their own code.

This seems, to me, to be like a club for really serious golf enthusiasts in which nobody knows what their handicap is. At the very least, should we not be building a good-sized body of data to back up our claims that code craft really does reduce the cost of change? It's been nearly a decade since the software craftsmanship manifesto. What have we been doing with our time that's more important than verifying its central premise?




Posted 2 months, 6 days ago on July 4, 2017