July 5, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Conceptual Correlation - Prototype Tool for .NET

With a few hours spare time over the last couple of days, I've had a chance to throw together a simple rough prototype of a tool that calculates the Conceptual Correlation between a .NET assembly (with a .pdb file in the same directory, very important that!) and a .txt file containing requirements descriptions. (e.g., text copied and pasted from your acceptance tests, or use case documents).

You can download it as a ZIP file, and to use it, just unzip the contents to a folder, and run the command-line Conceptual.exe with exactly 2 arguments: the first is the file name of the .NET assembly, the second is the file name of the requirements .txt.

e.g.,

Conceptual.exe "C:\MyProjects\FlightBooking\bin\debug\FlightBooking.dll" "C:\MyProjects\FlightBooking\usecases.txt"


I've been using it as an external tool in Visual Studio, with a convention-over-configuration argument of $(BinDir)\$(TargetName)$(TargetExt) $(ProjectDir)\requirements.txt



I've tried it on some fair-sized assemblies (e.g., Mono.Cecil.dll), and on some humungous text files (the entire text of my 200-page TDD book - all 30,000 words), and it's been pretty speedy on my laptop and the results have been interesting and look plausible.

Assumes code names are in PascalCase and/or CamelCase.

Sure, it's no Mercedes. At this stage, I just want to see what kind of results folk are getting from their own code and their own requirements. Provided with no warranty with no technical support, use at own risk, your home is at risk if you do not keep up repayments, mind the gap, etc etc. You know the drill :)

Conceptual.exe uses Mono.Cecil to pull out code names, and LemmaSharp to lemmatize words (e,g, "reporting", "reports" become "report"). Both are available via Nuget.

Have fun!







Posted 5 months, 5 days ago on July 5, 2017