July 9, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Why You Should Put Learning Opportunities Front-And-Centre In Dev Recruitment



A little Twitter poll I ran under the Codemanship acccount seems to confirm something that many of us have been saying for years. 41% of those polled said they could be lured from their current job by greater opportunities to learn.

Software development is a career that involves lifelong learning, and lot's of it. That's how we progress. So it doesn't come as a surprise that it was ranked significantly higher than "More money".

It's surprising, then, that learning opportunities don't figure higher in dev recruitment campaigns. I've banged this drum with clients many, many times. Want to attract and retain great developers? Make learning - mentoring, conferences, training, time to read, time to share - a greater part of the job. No, scratch that. Accept that learning is the job, and build your team culture around that inescapable fact.

When you're hiring, don't just look for what they know now. Look for their potential to learn. And their potential to teach (e.g. by example) the stuff they know so others can learn from them. And clear the way for that to happen. A lot.

Sadly, such employers are too few and far between. The unreasonable and unrealistic attitude that developers should arrive knowing everything they need to know, and no learning should go on on company time, is a leading cause of developer attrition.

It's also the reason why you've been searching in vain these last 6 months for a fluent Mandarin and Dutch-speaking full-stack JS/Node/Java/Clojure/Ruby/NoSQL/SQL/Docker/COBOL/Eiffel/Vim/Linux/Windows developer who has an HGV license and is licensed to practice medicine (salary: market rate).

Software developers tend to be highly educated, but the most important thing we learn is how to learn and it's one of the most important skills your money can buy. In return, one of the most valuable perks you can offer them is more opportunities to learn.

As a professional trainer and mentor, I am of course biased. I tell devs what I do, and they say "Wow, you must be really busy!" and I say "You'd think so, wouldn't you?" But the reality is that the majority of employers don't offer their devs any training at all, let alone time to, say, read a book.

The kind of bosses I run training for are unfortunately very much in the minority. Although, interestingly, they seem to have a lot less trouble hiring good developers.

Funny, that...



Posted 2 months, 2 days ago on July 9, 2017