July 13, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Do You Know Where Your Load-Bearing Code Is?

Do you know where your load-bearing code is?

In any system, there's some code that - if it were to fail - would be a big deal. Identifying that code helps us target our testing effort to where it's really needed.

But how do we find our load-bearing code? I'm going to propose a technique for measuring the "load-beariness" of individual methods. Let's call it criticality.

Working with your customer, identify the potential impact of failure of specific usage scenarios. It's about like estimating the relative value of features, only this time we're not asking "what's it worth?". We're asking "what's the potential cost of failure?" e.g., applying the brakes in an ABS system would have a relatively very high cost of system failure. Changing the font on a business report would have a relatively low cost of failure. Maybe it's a low-risk feature by itself, but will be used millions of times every day, greatly amplifying the risk.

Execute a system test case. See which methods were invoked end-to-end to pass the test. For each of those methods, assign the estimated cost of failure.

Now rinse and repeat with other key system test cases, adding the cost of failure to every method each scenario hits.

A method that's heavily reused in many low-risk scenarios could turn out to be cumulatively very critical. A method that's only executed once in a single very high-risk scenario could also be very critical.

As you play through each test case, you'll build a "heat map" of criticality in your code. Some areas will be safe and blue, some areas will be risky and red, and a few little patches of code may be white hot.

That is your load-bearing code. Target more exhaustive testing at it: random, data-driven, combinatorial, whatever makes sense. Test it more frequently. Inspect it carefully, many times with many pairs of eyes. Mathematically prove it's correct if you really need to. And, of course, do whatever you can to simplify it. Because simpler code is less likely to fail.

And you don't need code to make a start. You could calculate method criticality from, say, sequence diagrams, or from CRC cards, to give you a heads-up on how rigorous you may need to be implementing the design.






Posted 1 week ago on July 13, 2017