July 15, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Finding Load-Bearing Code - Thoughts On Implementation

I've been unable to shake this idea about identifying the load-bearing code in our software.

My very rough idea was to instrument the code and then run all our system or customer tests and record how many times methods are executed. The more times a method gets used (reused), the more critical it may be, and therefore may need more of our attention to make sure it isn't wrong.

This could be weighted by estimates for each test scenario of how big the impact of failure could be. But in my first pass at a tool, I'm thinking method call counts would be a simple start.

So, the plan is to inject this code into the beginning of the body of every method in the code under test (C# example), using something like Roslyn or Reflection.Emit:



The MethodCallCounter could be something as simple as a wrapper to a dictionary:



And this code, too, could be injected into the assembly we're instrumenting, or a reference added to a teeny tiny Codemanship.LoadBearing DLL.

Then a smidgen of code to write the results to a file (e.g., a spreadsheet) for further analysis.

The next step would be to create a test context that knows how critical the scenario is, using the customer's estimate of potential impact of failure, and instead of just incrementing the method call count, actually adds this number. So methods that get called in high-risk scenarios are shown as bearing a bigger load.



External to this would be a specific kind of runner (e.g., NUnit runner, FitNesse, SpecFlow etc) that executes the tests while changing the FailureImpact value using information tagged in each customer test somehow.

Thoughts?



(PS. This is also kind of how I'd add logging to a system, in case you were wondering.)





Posted 2 months, 3 days ago on July 15, 2017