August 11, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Update: Code Craft "Driving Test" FxCop Rules



I've been continuing work on a tool to automatically analyse .NET code submitted for the Code Craft "Driving Test".

Despite tying myself in knots for the first week trying to build a whole code analysis and reporting framework - when will I ever learn?! - I'm making good progress with Plan B this week.

Plan B is to go with the Visual Studio code analysis infrastructure (basically, FxCop). It's been more than a decade since I wrote FxCop rules, and it's been an uphill battle wrapping my head around it again (along with all the changes they've made since 2006).

But I now have 8 code quality rules that are kind of sort of working. Some work well. Some need more thought.

1. Methods can't be longer than 10 LOC

2. Methods can't have > 2 branches

3. Identifiers must be <= 20 characters. (Plan is to exempt test fixture/method names. TO-DO.)

4. Classes can't have > 8 methods (so max class size is 80 LOC)

5. Methods can't use more than one feature of another class. (My very basic interpretation of "Feature Envy". Again, TO-DO to improve that. Again, test code may be exempt.)

6. Boolean parameters are not allowed

7. Methods can't have > 3 parameters

8. Methods can't instantiate project types, unless they are factory or builder methods that return an abstract type. (The beginning of my Dependency Inversion "pincer movement". 2 more rules to come preventing invocation of static project methods, and methods that aren't virtual or abstract. Again, factories and builders will be exempt, as well as test code.)

What's been really fun about the last couple of weeks has been eating my own dog food. As each new rule emerges, I've been applying it frequently to my own code. I'm a great believer in the power of Continuous Inspection, and this has been a timely reminder of just how powerful it can be.

Red-Green-INSPECT-Refactor


After passing every test, and performing every refactoring, I run a code analysis that will eventually systematically check all my code for 15 or so issues. I fix any problems it raises there and then. I don't commit or push code that fails code analysis.



In Continuous Inspection, this is the equivalent of all my tests being green. Of course, as with functional tests, the resulting code quality may only be as good as the code quality tests. And I'm refining them with more and more examples, and applying them to real code to see what designs they encourage. So far, not so shabby.

And for those inevitable occasions when blindly obeying the design rules would make our code worse, the tool will have a mechanism for opting out of a rule. (Probably a custom attribute that you can apply to classes and fields and methods etc, specifying which rule you're breaking and - most importantly - documenting why. Again, a TO-DO.) In the Driving Test, I'm thinking candidates will get 3 such "hall passes".

If you want to see the work so far, and try it out for yourself, the source code's at https://github.com/jasongorman/CodeCraft.FxCop

And I've made a handful more tickets available for the trial Code Craft "Driving Test" for C# developers on Sept 16th. It's free this time, in exchange for your adventerous and forgiving participation in this business experiment :)

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Posted 4 months, 3 days ago on August 11, 2017