September 22, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Evil FizzBuzz (or "So you think you're a team?")

Among the advanced topics we cover on the third day of the Codemanship TDD course, Continuous Integration presents some of the biggest challenges for dev teams.

Participants are subjected to an exercise called Evil FizzBuzz, which you might like to try on your team (or at your coding event).

Based on the drinking game, FizzBuzz is a very simple algorithm.

1. Generate a sequence of integers from 1 to 100.
2. Any integers that are divisible by 3, replace with "Fizz".
3. Any that are divisible by 5, replace with "Buzz".
4. Any that are divisible by 3 and 5, "FizzBuzz".
5. And, for a bit of extra spice, any that are prime numbers, replace with - or concatenate if already "Fizz" or "Buzz" - "Wizz".
6. Output as a comma-delimited string.

So the first 15 in the sequence would go:

1, Wizz, FizzWizz, 4, BuzzWizz, Fizz, Wizz, 8, Fizz, Buzz, Wizz, Fizz, Wizz, 14, FizzBuzz

This is pretty straightforward for a programmer to code a solution to, and makes a spiffy exercise for learning about triangulation in TDD.

Now to make it evil...

* Split the group up into 6 pairs (or threes, or ones, depending on how many people you've got).

* Assign each part of FizzBuzz above (1-6) to a pair. They can only work on code for that part of the whole.

* Task them to work together - but only coding/TDD-ing their individual parts - to deliver a complete solution that produce the desired output.

Give them about an hour. And stand back and enjoy the train wreck.

To achieve this, they need distributed version control. So someone in the group needs to create, say, a GitHub repository that they can all contribute to. Then someone needs to put the skeleton of a source code project in that repository for pairs to work in. Then someone needs to set up Continuous Integration for that source code project so that merges can be built and tested.

All of this typically takes up more than half the time allotted. And until they have a green build to merge into, everybody's blocked from pushing. The yak shaving's what trips up half the groups I've seen attempt Evil FizzBuzz. DevOps is not commonly our strong suit.

And, of course, they have to agree on stuff. They have to agree on what language they're going to use. They have to agree on a basic design for how all the parts will fit together. They have to agree on how the process of collaboration's going to work if they're not going to end up tripping over each other's feet.

This is where the other half usually come unstuck. Most developers and dev orgs just aren't used to this level of collaboration. It's intense. Really intense. What usually happens is they either spend 50 minutes out of their hour arguing and getting nowhere, or they just go off into their separate corners and do their own thing. Both lead to failure.

And then there's the whole lesson behind the exercise: if the group isn't disciplined about CI, they will fail to deliver Evil FizzBuzz. Guaranteed.

What I mean by that is that the protocols of CI need to be keenly observed to prevent pairs merging conflicting changes on top of each other. And the feedback CI gives us about where the code's going must not be ignored. Every pair should be keeping one eye on the build. When they see a new build succeed, it's time to get the latest changes and see how it fits in with what you're doing.

Agreeing on things. DevOps. Constant communication. Situational awareness. Coordinating. All things dev teams tend to suck at.

And that's why I love this exercise. Especially on the rare occasions that you see a group ace it, like my training client this week. It speaks volumes about them as a team, and it's a joy to watch it unfold as each build goes green and you see the solution taking shape in front of your eyes.

The purpose of Evil FizzBuzz is to (hopefully) open dev teams' eyes to CI as a means of communication in collaborative design, and in particular to just how intense that collaboration often needs to be, and how disciplined about CI they need to be for it to work.

I'll bet you a shiny penny your team can't do it. Most can't.

Now prove me wrong.







Posted 2 months, 3 days ago on September 22, 2017