December 1, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Don't Succumb To "Facebook Envy". Solve The Problem In Front Of You

A trend that's been growing for some time now is what I call "Facebook envy". Dev teams working on bread-and-butter problems seem almost embarrassed not to be solving problems on the scale Facebook have to.

99.9% of developers are not working at this scale, and are never likely to. And yet I see a strange obsession with scale that too often distracts teams from more pressing problems.

I use the analogy of a rock band obsessing over how their songs can be arranged for a 90-piece orchestra for a performance at the massive O2 Arena in London, and failing to prepare for their upcoming gig in the bowling alley at the back of the local pub.

Of course, we hear the stories about tech start-ups who didn't prepare for greatness and discovered that their architecture didn't scale. We hear those stories precisely because of the pervasiveness of those businesses in our lives after the fact. Just like all the stories we read about how bands became mega-successful, because who wants to read about bands that didn't? History is written by the winners.

What we don't hear about is the other 999/1000 tech start-ups who did prepare for greatness and wasted their time and their money doing it.

Before a tech start-up needs to scale, it needs to survive. Surviving means solving the problems that are in front of you. By all means, keep one eye on the future - a sense of direction's important. But not both eyes.

It's a similar thing to cash flow. Sure, your product may be super-profitable eventually. But if you can't pay your staff and keep the lights on in the meantime, you won't be there to collect.

The best way to scale-proof your start-up is to solve today's problems in a way that doesn't block you from adapting to tomorrow's. This is why I work so hard to persuade teams to focus on the factors that make software and systems hard to change, instead of on trying to anticipate those changes at the start. It tends to make the end product far more complicated than it needed to be, and things rarely turn out the way you planned.

Some common technologies are inherently scalable, too. Indeed, these days, most technology stacks are, even if it takes a bit more imagination to achieve it. Facebook are the best example of this. Who'd have thought, 12 years ago, that PHP and MySQL would scale to a billion users? Facebook solved the problems that were in front of them. They didn't adapt those technologies speculatively... just in case they ended up with a billion users.

If you use scalable technologies, design your architectures in such a way that they would be easy to partition if needed (i.e., separate concerns cleanly from the get-go), and - most importantly - deliver code that can be changed when new times require it, then you'll be able to solve today's tangible problems and keep the door open to tomorrow's intangible possibilities.




Posted 8 months, 2 days ago on December 1, 2017