December 5, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Automating Code Reviews

This comes up quite often these days, so I thought I'd scribble my thoughts down, for posterity if nothing else.

I increasingly come across dev teams who have adopted a policy where every check-in needs to be reviewed before it can be accepted. In many cases, this has created a bottleneck while developers waiting to get a green build are stuck on the availability of their peers to do the reviewing.

Imagine, every time you want to check your code in, you have to wait for a tester to put your code through its paces. We knew that was a major bottleneck, so we started automating our tests. If the tester would normally check to see what happens if a customer cancels an order, we would write a unit test for the cancel() function of an order.

It's really not much different for code inspections. If a reviewer would normally check that no classes are too big (say, having more than 200 lines of code), we could write a bit of code to inspect every class and report any that exceed our limit.

A pretty comprehensive code inspection could cover a large amount of code, checking for a whole range of issues, in a tiny fraction of the time it takes a human. More importantly, those checks could be run any time. No need to wait for Jenny to get off the phone, or Rajesh to come back from lunch. You'd no longer be blocked.

This, of course, takes some considerable investment early on to develop the right suite of automated quality checks. But I see more and more teams struggling to maintain the pace of development and high code quality, and such an investment really pays for itself many times over, even on relatively short timescales.

It's for this reason that I'm going to be giving Continuous Inspection a big push in 2018. I think most teams should seriously consider it.



Posted 1 month ago on December 5, 2017