December 7, 2017

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

"This would never have happened if we'd written it in Haskell" - Bah Humbug!

Spurred on by a spate of social media activity of the "We replaced a system written in X with one written in Y, and it was way better" kind, I just wanted to throw my hat into the ring on this topic.

As someone with practical insights into high-integrity software development, I can confidently attest that this is bunk of the highest order. There is no programming language that assures reliability.

Sure, there are languages with built-in features that can help, but you actually have to do stuff to make sure your code works 99.999999999% of the time. Y'know? Like testing and wotnot.

For example, you can inflict all kinds of damage in C, thanks to direct manipulation of memory, but you don't have to abuse those features of the language. A Bugatti Veyron has a top speed of 254 mph, but you don't have to drive it at 254 mph.

"We would never have had that crash if we'd been driving a Volvo" really means "We'd never have had that crash if we'd been driving slower".

If you want to avoid dangling pointers in a C program, you can. It just takes a bit of know-how and a bit of discipline. Don't blame the language for any shortcomings you might have in either. The difference the language makes is small compared to the difference you make.


ADDENDUM: Just to clarify, I'm not saying better languages and tools don't help. What I'm saying is that the difference they make can be very small compared to other factors. How do I know this? Well, I've been programming for 35 years and have worked in a dozen or more languages on real projects. So there's that. But also, I've worked with a lot of teams, and noticed how the same team using different tools gets similar results, while different teams using identical tools can get strikingly different results. So I conclude that the team makes the bigger difference, by orders of magnitude. So I choose to focus more on teams and how they work than on the tools, by orders of magnitude. And it's not as if tools and technology don't get enough focus within the industry :)




Posted 4 days, 15 hours ago on December 7, 2017