January 20, 2018

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

10 Classic TDD Mistakes

20 years of practicing Test-Driven Development, and training and coaching a few thousand developers in it, has taught me this is not a trivial skillset to learn. There are many potential pitfalls, and I've seen many teams dashed on the rocks by some classic mistakes.

You can learn from their misfortunes, and hopefully steer a path through these treacherous waters. Here are ten classic mistakes I've seen folk make with TDD.

1. Underestimating The Learning Curve

Often, when developers try to adopt TDD, they have unrealistic expectations about the results they'll be getting in the short term. "Red-Green-Refactor" sounds simple enough, but it hides a whole world of ideas, skills and habits that need to be built to be effective at it. If I had a pound for every team that said "we tried TDD, and it didn't work"... Plan for a journey that will take months and years, not days and weeks.

2. Confusing TDD with Testing

The primary aim of TDD is to come up with a good design that will satisfy our customer's needs. It's a design discipline that just happens to use tests as specifications. A lot of people still approach TDD as a testing discipline, and focus too much on making sure everything is tested when they should be thinking about the design. If you're rigorous about applying the Golden Rule (only write solution code when a failing test requires it), your coverage will be high. But that isn't the goal. It's a side benefit.

3. Thinking TDD Is All The Testing They'll Ever Need

If you practice TDD fairly rigorously, the resulting automated tests will probably be sufficient much of the time. But not all of the time. Too many teams pay no heed to whether high risk code needs more testing. (Indeed, too many teams pay no heed to high risk code at all. Do you know where your load-bearing code is?) And what about all those scenarios you didn't think of? It's rare to see a test suite that covers every possible combination of user inputs. More work has to be done to explore the edges of what was specified.

4. Not Starting With Failing Customer Tests

In all approaches to writing software, how we collaborate with our customers is critically important. Designs should be driven directly from testable specifications that we've explicitly agreed with them. In TDD, unsurprisingly, these testable specifications come in the form of... erm... tests. The design process starts by working closely with the customer to flesh out executable acceptance tests that fail. We do not start writing code until we have those failing customer tests. We do not stop writing code until those tests are passing. But a lot of teams still set out on their journey with only the vaguest sense of the destination. Write all the unit tests you want, but without failing executable customer tests, you're just being super-precise about your own assumptions of what the customer wants.

5. Confusing Tools With Practices

Just because they're written using a customer test specification tool like Cucumber or Fitnesse does not mean those are customer tests. They could be automated using JUnit, and be customer tests. What makes them customer tests is that you wrote them with the customer, codifying their examples of how the software will be used. Similarly, just because you used a mock objects framework, that doesn't mean that you are mocking. Mocking is a technique for discovering the design of interfaces by writing failing interaction tests. Just because you're writing JUnit tests doesn't mean you're doing TDD. Just because you use Resharper doesn't mean you're refactoring. Just because you're running Jenkins doesn't mean you're doing Continuous Integration. Kubernetes != Continuous Delivery. And the list goes on (and on and on). Far too many developers think that using certain tools will automatically produce certain results. The tools will not do your thinking for you. As far as I'm aware, RSpec doesn't discuss the requirements with the customer and write the tests itself. You have to talk to the customer.

6. Not Actually Doing TDD. At All.

When I run the Codemanship TDD training workshop, I often start the first day by asking for a show of hands from people who think they've done TDD. At the end of the first day I ask them to raise their hands if they still think they've done TDD. The number is always considerably lower. Here's the thing: I know from experience that 9 out of 10 developers who put "TDD" on their CV really mean "unit testing". Many don't even know what TDD is. I know this sounds basic, but if you're going to try doing TDD, try doing TDD. Google it. Read an introduction. Watch a tutorial or three. Buy a book. Come on a course.

7. Skimping On Refactoring

To produce code that's as clean as I feel it needs to be, I find I tend to spend about 50% of my time refactoring. Most dev teams do a lot less. Many do none at all. Now, I know many will say "enough refactoring" is subjective, and the debate rages on social media about whether anyone is doing too much refactoring, but let's be frank: the vast majority of us are simply not doing anywhere near enough. The effects of this are felt soon enough, as the going gets harder and harder. Refactoring's a very undervalued skill; I know from my training orders. For every ten TDD courses I run, I might be asked to run one refactoring course. Too little refactoring makes TDD unsustainable. Typical outcome: "We did TDD for 6 months, but our tests got so hard to change that we threw them away."

8. Making The Tests Too Big

The granularity of tests is key to making TDD work as a design discipline, as well as determining how effective your test suites will be at pinpointing broken code. When our tests ask too many questions (e.g., "What are the first 10 Fibonacci numbers?"), we find ourselves having to make a bunch of design decisions before we get feedback. When we work in bigger batches, we make more mistakes. I like to think of it like crossing a stream using stepping stones; if the stones are too far apart, we have to make big, risky leaps, increasing the risk of falling in. Start by asking "What's the first Fibonacci number?".

9. Making The Tests Too Small

Conversely, I also often see people writing tests that focus on minute details that would naturally fall out of passing a more interesting higher-level test. For example, I see people writing tests for getters and setters that really only need to exist because they're used in some interesting behaviour that the customer wants. I've even seen tests that create an object and then assert that it isn't null. Those kinds of tests are redundant. I can kind of see where the thinking comes from, though. "I want to declare a BankAccount class, but the Golden Rule of TDD is I can't until I have a failing test that requires it. So I'll write one." But this is coming at it from the wrong direction. In TDD, we don't write tests to force the design we want. We write tests for behaviour that the customer wants, and discover the design by passing it (and by refactoring afterwards if necessary). We'll need a BankAccount class to test crediting an account, for example. We'll need a getter for the balance to check the result. Focus on behaviour and let the details follow. There's a balance to be struck on test granularity that comes with experience.

10. Going Into "Design Autopilot"

Despite what you may have heard, TDD doesn't take care of the design for you. You can follow the discipline to the letter, and end up with a crappy design.

TDD helps by providing frequent "beats" in development to remind us to think about the design. We're thinking about what the code should do when we write our failing test. We're thinking about how it should do it when we're passing the test. And we're thinking about how maintainable our solution is after we've passed the test as we refactor the code. It's all design, really. But it's not magic.

YOU STILL HAVE TO THINK ABOUT THE DESIGN. A LOT.


So, there you have it: 10 classic TDD mistakes. But all completely avoidable, with some thought, some practice, and maybe a bit of help from an old hand.



Posted 1 month, 3 days ago on January 20, 2018