February 1, 2018

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

BDD & Specification By Example - Where Did We Go Wrong?

I've been saving this post up for a while, but with a bit of pre-dinner free time I wanted to put it out there now.

I meet a lot of teams, and one thing many of them tell me is that the "customer tests" they've been driving their designs from are actually written by the developers, not the customer.



Sure, they're written using a "Behaviour-Driven Development" or "Acceptance Testing" tool like Cucumber or Fitnesse. But just because you've built a "granny annex" on your house, if there's no granny living in it, it's just an "annex".

We've dropped the ball on this. The CHAOS report, published every year by the Standish Group, consistently cites lack of customer involvement as the number one factor in project failure. A tool won't fix that.

Especially when that tool wasn't designed with customer collaboration in mind. When your "Getting Started" guide begins "First, install Visual Studio..." or requires your customer to learn a mark-up language or to use version control, arguably you're bound to have a hard time getting them to engage in the process.

Increasingly, I work with teams who want to somehow connect the way their customer actually prefers to capture examples with the way devs like to automate tests. 90% of the time, that means pulling data out of Excel spreadsheets - still the most widely used tool in both communities - into unit tests. Some unit testing frameworks even have that facility built in (e.g., MSTest for .NET). But reading data from spreadsheets is child's play for most developers. With OLD DB or JDBC, for example, a spreadsheet's just a database.

But, regardless of the tools, the problem most teams need to solve is a people problem. I've found that close customer involvement is so critical to the chances of a team succeeding at solving the customer's problems that I actually stop development until they engage at the level we need them to. No play? No code.

The mistake many of us make is to give them a choice. "Would you like to spend a lot of time with us discussing requirements and playing with candidate releases and giving us feedback?" "No thanks, ta very much. See you in a year's time."

We made a rod for our backs by allowing them to be absentee partners and trying to figure out what they want and need for them. Specification By Example presents us with an opportunity to make the relationship clearer. The customer has to be "trained" to understand that if they haven't agreed a test for it, they ain't gonna get it.




Posted 11 months, 2 days ago on February 1, 2018