February 4, 2018

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Don't Bake In Yesterday's Business Model With Unmaintainable Code

I'm running a little poll on the Codemanship Twitter account asking whether code craft skills should be something every professional developer should have.




I've always seen these skills as foundational for a career as a developer. Once we've learned to write code that kind of works, the next step in our learning should be to develop the skills needed to write reliable and maintainable code. The responses so far suggest that about 95% of us agree (more than 70% of us strongly).

Some enlightened employers recognise the need for these skills, and address the lack of them when taking on new graduates. Those new hires are the lucky ones, though. Most employers offer no training in unit testing, TDD, refactoring, Continuous Integration or design principles at all. They also often have nobody more experienced who could mentor developers in those things. It's still sadly very much the case that many software developers go through their careers without ever being exposed to code craft.

This translates into a majority of code being less reliable and less maintainable, which has a knock-on effect in the wider economy caused by the dramatically higher cost of changing that code. It's not the actual £ cost that has the impact, of course. It's the "drag factor" that hard-to-change code has on the pace of innovation. Bosses routinely cite IT as being a major factor in impeding progress. I'm sure we can all think of businesses that were held back by their inability to change their software and their systems.

For all our talk of "business agility", only a small percentage of organisations come anywhere close. It's not because they haven't bought into the idea of being agile. The management magazines are now full of chatter about agility. No shortage of companies that aspire to be more responsive to change. They just can't respond fast enough when things change. The code that helped them scale up their operations simultaneously bakes in a status quo, making it much harder to evolve the way they do business. Software giveth, and software taketh away. I see many businesses now achieving ever greater efficiencies at doing things the way they needed to be done 5, 10 or 20 years ago, but unable to adapt to the way things are today and might be tomorrow.

I see this is finance, in retail, in media, in telecoms, in law, in all manner of private sector organisations. And I see it in the public sector, too. "IT delays" is increasingly the reason why government policies are massively delayed or fail to be rolled out altogether. It's a pincer movement: we can't do X at the scale we need to without code, and we can't change the code to do X+1 for a rapidly changing business landscape.

I've always maintained that code craft is a business imperative. I might even go as far as to say a societal imperative, as software seeps into every nook and cranny of our lives. If we don't address issues like how easy to change our code is, we risk baking in the past, relying on inflexible and unreliable systems that are as anachronistic to the way things need to be in the future as our tired old and no-longer-fit-for-purpose systems of governance. An even bigger risk is that other countries will steal a march on us, in much the same way that more agile tech start-ups can steam ahead of established market players simply because they're not dragging millions of lines of legacy code behind them.

While the fashion today is for "digital transformations", encoding all our core operations in software, we must be mindful that legacy code = legacy business model.

So what is your company doing to improve their code craft?







Posted 2 months, 1 day ago on February 4, 2018