March 24, 2018

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Code Craft: What Is It, And Why Do You Need It?

One of my missions at the moment is to spread the word about the importance of code craft to organisations of all shapes and sizes.

The software craftsmanship (now "software crafters") movement may have left some observers with the impression that a bunch of prima donna programmers were throwing our toys out of the pram over "beautiful code".

For me, nothing could be further from the truth. It's always been clear in my mind - and I've tried to be clear when talking about craft - that it's not about "beautiful code", or about "masters and apprentices". It has always been about delivering software that works - does what end users need - and that can be easily changed to solve new problems.

I learned early on that iterating our designs was the ultimate requirements discipline. Any solution of any appreciable complexity is something we're unlikely to get right first time. That would be the proverbial "hole in one". We should expect to need multiple passes at it, each pass getting it less wrong.

Iterating software designs requires us to be able to keep changing the code over and over. If the code's difficult to change, then we get less throws of the dice. So there's a simple business truth here: the harder our code is to change, the less likely we are to deliver a good working solution. And, as times goes on, the less able we are to keep our working solution working, as the problem itself changes.

For me, code craft's about delivering the right thing in the short-to-medium term, and about sustaining the pace of innovation to keep our solution working in the long term.

The factors involved here are well-understood.

1. The longer it takes us to re-test our software, the bigger the cost of fixing anything we broke. This is supported by a mountain of evidence collected from thousands of projects over several decades. The cost of fixing bugs rises exponentially the longer they go undetected. So a comprehensive suite of good fast-running automated tests is an essential ingredient in minimising the cost of changing code. I see it being a major bottleneck for many organisations, and see the devastating effect long testing feedback loops can have on a business.

2. The harder it is to understand the code, the more likely it is we'll break it if we change it.

3. The more complex our code is, the harder it is to understand and the easier it is to break. More ways for it to be wrong, basically.

4. Duplication in our code multiplies the cost of changing common logic.

5. The more the different units* in our software depend on each other, the wider the potential impact of changing one unit on other units. (The "ripple effect").

6. When units aren't easily swappable, the impact of changing one unit can break other modules that interact with it.

* Where a "unit" could be a function, a module, a component, or a service. A unit of reusable code, essentially.

So, six key factors determine the cost of changing code:

* Test Assurance & Execution Time
* Readability
* Complexity
* Duplication
* Coupling
* Abstraction of Dependencies

Add to these, a few other factors can make a big difference.

Firstly, the amount of "friction" in the delivery pipeline. I'd classify "friction" here as "steps in releasing or deploying working software into production that take a long time and/or have a high cost". Manually testing the software before a release would be one example of high friction. Manually deploying the executable files would be another.

The longer it takes, the more it costs and the more error-prone the delivery process is, the less often we can deliver. When we deliver less often, we're iterating more slowly. When we iterate more slowly, we're back to my "less throws of the dice" metaphor.

Frequency of releases is directly related also to the size of each release. Releasing changes in big batches has other drawbacks, too. Most importantly - because software either works as a whole or it doesn't - big releases incorporating many changes present us with an all-or-nothing choice. If change X is wrong, we now have to carefully rework that one thing with all the other changes still in place. So much easier to do a single release for change X by itself, and if it doesn't work, roll it back.

Another aside factor to consider is how easy it is to undo mistakes if necessary. If my big refactoring goes awry, can I easily get back to the last good state of the code? If a release goes pear-shaped, can we easily roll it back to a working version, with minimal disruption to our end customer?

Small releases help a lot in this respect, as does Version Control and Continuous Integration. VCS and CI is like seatbelts for programmers. It can significantly reduce lost time if we have a little accident.

So, I add:

* Small & Frequent Releases
* Frictionless Delivery Processes (build-test-deploy automation)
* Version Control
* Continuous Integration

To my working definition of "code craft".

Noted that there's more to delivering software than these things. There's requirements, there's UX, there's InfoSec, there's data management, and a heap of other considerations. Which is why I'm clear to disambiguate code craft and software development.

Organisations who depend on software need code that works and that can change and stay working. My belief is that anyone writing software for a living needs to get to grips with code craft.

As software continues to "eat the world", this need will grow. I've watched $multi-billion on their knees because their software and systems couldn't change fast enough. As the influence of code spreads into every facet of life, our ability to change code becomes more and more a limiting factor on what we can achieve.

To borrow from Peter McBreen's original book on software craftsmanship, there's a code craft imperative.




Posted 5 months, 4 days ago on March 24, 2018