May 25, 2018

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Ever-Decreasing Cycles - I Called It Right

I'm right about something roughly once in a decade, if I'm lucky. Looking back over 13 years of blog posts, I nominate this little gem as a candidate for "That Thing I Called Right", which predicted that - as our computers grew ever more powerful - continuous background code review would become a thing.

The progression seemed perfectly logical. At the time I wrote it, we'd seen the advent of continuous background code compilation, giving us instant feedback when we make silly syntax errors. Younger developers may not be aware of just what a difference that made to those of us who remember compiling the code involving going away to get a coffee (or lunch, or dinner and a show). So much time saved!

With less brain power dedicated to "does it run?", we were freed up to think about a higher question: does it work?. In 2008, continuous background testing tools like Infinitest and JUnitMax were becoming more popular. Today, I see them quite widely used, and can easily foresee a time when we're all using them within the next decade.

So we've progressed from "does it run?" to "does it work?" as our computers have increased their processing power, and the next evolution I predicted was to continuously ask "will it be easy to change?" At the time, the majority of code analysis tools took too long to do what they did to be running continuously in the background alongside compilation and functional testing. (There were one or two adventurous experimental tools, but we haven't heard much from them in the meantime.)

With Microsoft's Roslyn compiler, continuous background code review is now finally a thing. We can write code quality checks and build them into the compilation pipeline, creating feedback on things like variable names, method size and complexity, couplings, and all that stuff we care about for maintainability, in real time, as we type the code. I suspect such a capability will be added to other compiler platforms in the next decade or so.

Sure, it's still early days, and my experiments with it suggest computing power needs maybe one or two more iterations to rise to meet the number-crunching challenge, but in a practical form that we can begin using today - just like those plucky pioneers who ventured out with Infinitest in the early days it's here. There'll be a learning curve. Start climbing it now, is my recommendation.

My hope for continuous background code review is that it will yet again free up our minds to focus on more important questions, like "is this what they really need?"

And that will be a great day for software.


* And, yes, I had hoped I'd been right about high-integrity software becoming mainstream, but interest in that has flat-lined these past 20 years. Maybe next year... Ho hum.




Posted 2 months, 5 days ago on May 25, 2018