July 2, 2018

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Level 4 Agile Maturity

I recently bought new carpets for my home, and the process of getting a quote was very interesting. First, I booked an appointment online for someone to come round and measure up. This appointment took about an hour, and much of that time was spent entering measurements into a software application that created a 2D model of the rooms.

Then I visited a local-ish store - this was a big national chain - and discussed choices and options and prices. This took about an hour and a half, most of which was spent with the sales adviser reading the measurements off a print-out of the original data set and typing them into a sales application to generate a quote.

There were only 3 sales people on the shop floor, and it struck me that all this time spent re-entering data that someone had already entered into a software application was time not spent serving customers. How many sales, I wondered, might be lost because there were no sales people free to serve? We discussed this, and the sales advisor agreed that this system very probably cost sales: and lots of them. (Only the previous week I had visited the local, local shop for this chain, and walked out because nobody was free to serve me.)

With more time and research, we might have been able to put a rough figure on potential sales lost during this data re-entering activity for the entire chain (400 stores).

As a software developer, this problem struck me immediately. It had never really occurred to the sales advisor before, he told me. We probably all have stories like this. I can think of many times during my 25-year career where I've noticed a problem that a piece of software might be able to solve. We tend to have that problem-solving mindset. We just can't help ourselves.

And this all reminded me of a revelation I had maybe 16 years ago, working on a dev team who had temporarily lost its project manager and requirements analyst, and had nobody telling us what to build. So we went to the business and asked "How can we help?"

It turned out there was a major, major problem that was IT-related, and we learned that the IT departmet had steadfastly ignored their pleas to try and solve it for years. So we said "Okay, we'll have a crack at it."

We had many meetings with key business stakeholders, which led to us identifying roughly what the problem was and creating a Balanced Scorecard of business goals that we'd work directly towards.

We shadowed end users who worked in the processes that we needed to improve to see what they did and think about how IT could make it easier. Then we iteratively and incrementally reworked existing IT systems specifically to achieve those improvements.

For several months, it worked like a dream. Our business customers were very happy with the progress we were making. They'd never had a relationship with an IT team like this before. It was a revelation to them and to us.

But IT management did not like it. Not one bit. We weren't following a plan. They wanted to bring us back to heel, to get project management in place to tell us what to do, and to get back to the original plan of REPLACING ALL THE THINGS.

But for 4 shiny happy months I experienced a different kind of software development. Like Malcom McDowell in Star Trek Generations, I experienced the bliss of the Nexus and would now do pretty much anything to get back there.

So, ever since, I've encouraged dev teams to take charge of their destinies in this way. To me, it's a higher level of requirements maturity. We progress from:

1. Executing a plan, to
2. Building a product, to
3. Solving real problems people bring to us, to
4. Going out there and pro-actively seeking problems we could solve

We evolve from being told "do this" to being told "build this" to being told "solve this" to eventually not being told at all. We start as passive executors of plans and builders of features to being active engaged stakeholders in the business, instigating the work we do in response to business needs and opportunities that we find or create.

For me, this is the partnership that so many dev teams aspire to, but can never reach because management won't let them. Just like, ultimately, they woudn't let us in that particular situation.

But I remain convinced it's the next step in the evolution of software development: one up from Agile. It is inevitable*.




*...that we will pretend to do it for certifications while the project office continues to be the monkey on our backs


Posted some seconds ago on July 2, 2018