September 28, 2018

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Micro-cycles & Developing Your Inner Egg Timer

When I'm coaching developers in TDD and refactoring, I find it important to stress the benefits of keeping one foot on the path of working code at all times.

I talk about Little Red Riding Hood, and how she was warned not to stray off the path into the deep dark forest. Bad things happen in the deep dark forest. Similarly, I warn devs to stay on that path of code that works - code that's shippable - and not go wandering off into the deep dark forest of code that's broken.

Of course, in practice, we can't change code without breaking it. So the real skill is in learning how to make the changes we need to make by briefly stepping off the path and stepping straight back on again.

This requires developers to build a kind of internal egg timer that nudges them when they haven't seen their tests pass for too long.



An exercise I've used to develop my internal egg timer uses a real egg timer (or the timer on my smartphone). When I'm mindfully practicing refactoring, for example, I'll set a timer to countdown for 60 seconds, and start it the moment I edit any code.

The moment a source file goes "dirty" - no longer compiles or no longer passes the tests - the countdown starts. I have to get back to passing tests before the sands run out (or the alarm goes off).

I'll do that for maybe 10-15 minutes, then I'll drop the countdown to 50 seconds and do another 10-15 minutes. Then 40 seconds. Then 30. Always trying, as best I can, to get what I need to do done and get back to passing tests before the countdown ends.

I did this every day for about 45-60 minutes for several months, and what I found at the end was that I'd grown a sort of internal countdown. Now, when I haven't seen the tests pass for a few minutes, I get a little knot in my stomach. It makes me genuinely uncomfortable.

I do a similar exercise with TDD, but the countdowns apply the moment I have a failing test. I have 60 seconds to make the test pass. Then 50. Then 40. Then 30. This encourages me to take smaller steps, in tighter micro-cycles.

If my test requires me to take too big a leap, I have to scale back or break it down to simpler steps to get me where I want to go.

The skill is in making progress with one foot firmly on the path of working code at all times. Your inner egg timer is the key.




Posted 2 months, 1 day ago on September 28, 2018