October 6, 2018

...Learn TDD with Codemanship

Be The Code You Want To See In The World

It's no big secret that I'm very much from the "Just Do It" school of thought on how to apply good practices to software development. I meet teams all the time who complain that they've been forbidden to do, say, TDD by their managers. My answer is always "Next time, don't ask".

After 25 years doing this for a living, much of that devoted to mentoring teams in the developer arts , I've learned two important lessons:

1. It's very difficult to change someone's mind once it's made up. I wasted a lot of time "selling" the benefits of technical practices like unit testing and refactoring to people for whom no amount of evidence or logic was ever going to make them try it. It's one of the reasons I don't do much conference speaking these days.

2. The best strategies rely on things within our control. Indeed, strategies that rely on things beyond our control aren't really strategies at all. They're just wishful thinking.

The upshot of all this is an approach to working that has two core tenets:

1. Don't seek permission

2. Do what you can do

Easy to say, right? It does imply that, as a professional, you have control over how you work.

Here's the thing: as a professional, you have control over how you work. It's not so much a matter of getting that control, as recognising that - in reality - because you're the one writing the code, you already have that control. Your boss is very welcome to write the code themselves if they want it done their way

Of course, with great power comes great responsibility. You want control? Take control. But be sure to be acting in the best interests of your customer and other stakeholders, including the other developers on your team. Code is something you inflict on people. Do it with kindness.

And so there you have it. A mini philosophy. Don't rant and rave about how code should be done. Just do it. Be the code you want to see in the world.

Plenty of developers talk a good game, but their software tells a different story. It's often the case that the great and worthy and noble ideas you see presented in books and at conferences bear little resemblence to how their proponents really work. I've been learning, through Codemanship, that it's more effective to show teams what you do. Talk is cheap. That's why my flagship TDD workshop doesn't have any slides. Every idea is illustrated with real code, every practice is demonstrated right in front of you.

And there isn't a single practice in any Codemanship course I haven't applied many times on real software for real businesses. It's all real, and it all really works in the real world.

What typically prevents teams from applying them isn't their practicality, or how difficult they are to learn. (Although don't underestimate the learning curves.) The obstacles are normally whether they have the will to give it a proper try, and tied up in that, whether they're allowed to try it.

My advice is simple: learn to do it under the radar, in the background, under the bedsheets with a torch, and then the decision to apply it on real software in real teams for real customers will be entirely yours.





Posted 1 week, 3 days ago on October 6, 2018